It’s Mystery Day at the Indie e-Con, so I wanted to share about the indie-published mysteries I’ve read and enjoyed. Mysteries are one of my favorite genres, after all, so I couldn’t pass up the opportunity!

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7840074-only-angels-are-bulletproof

Although this book isn’t technically indie-published, the author is an indie author who wrote a book for the Vintage Jane Austen series, Emily Ann Benedict. This is a clean, clever, and funny FBI mystery with a refreshing Christian message. Read my review on Goodreads.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/27670663-kate-s-innocence?ac=1&from_search=true

This book is by one of my favorite authors, Sarah Holman. It’s the first of a series (I’ve enjoyed them all!) that’s exciting, clean, and character-driven, with great Christian depth. Read my review on Goodreads.


https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23528961-anon-sir-anon?ac=1&from_search=true


This mystery was so much fun! Written in the crisp, witty, and deliciously descriptive style of old British detective novels, Rachel Heffington’s book was a wonderful experience. Read my review on Goodreads.


https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01H5RE1XC/ref=x_gr_w_glide_ku_bb?ie=UTF8&tag=x_gr_w_glide_ku_bb-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B01H5RE1XC&SubscriptionId=1MGPYB6YW3HWK55XCGG2

I’ve only read books 4, 5, and 6 of this fun and absorbing series, but I’m itching to read the others. Lisa B. Thomas is an author I proofread for with a real knack for spinning a mystery.

What are your favorite mysteries?

Hi, everyone! I hope you’re enjoying the Indie e-Con kickoff. Welcome to your next stop on the scavenger hunt. I have the immense pleasure of hosting Tammy Lash, and it’s been wonderful getting to know her. I hope you enjoy her as much as I do!



Hi, Kelsey! Thanks for hosting me on your blog today! Hey, everyone!



Kelsey and I met this week through Indie e-Con. I learned that this super-sweet gal lives in hot and sunny Texas. That’s waaaaaaay far away from the wilds of Michigan’s upper peninsula where I live. My family and I live just minutes away from chilly Lake Superior where SNOW and ICE CHUNKS are still glistening happily on the beaches. I think Kelsey would appreciate this last bit of snow. I don’t mind sharing! What do you say, Kelsey? Join me for snow cones?



The U.P. is a beautiful place to be. My family and I moved to our favorite vacation spot just eleven days ago–so life has been too hectic to enjoy the scenery that inspired my first novel,White Wolf and the Ash Princess. When renovations slow down on our new fixer-upper, I plan on resuming work on the two companion novels to White Wolf, a short story, and a children’s devotional. I love writing Hybrid History. Wait. What is it? Well, it’s a brand new genre–that I made up. I combine romance, adventure, inspiration, steampunk, fantasy (in the form of Native American legends), and I mix it up with historical elements. Want to see what it’s all about? Discover Hybrid History by reading White Wolf and the Ash Princess. It’s waiting for you in paperback or Kindle on Amazon–OR–you can contact me for a signed copy.

Get on Amazon!

You can follow me on the following social media sites. I’d love to see you! I can make you a snow cone, too…but for a limited time! Our snow pile next to our house is daily shrinking. ;P


Kelsey popping back in to give you some links to follow for the scavenger hunt. You can find my post on Katy Huth Jones’s blog.  To find the all-important first stop on the scavenger hunt, go to Kandi J. Wyatt’s website. And to find the complete list of participants, go here.

 Don’t forget the fantastic giveaway prize package!

Ace Carroway 2-Book Set
3 random ebooks from Indie e-Con authors
Cover Design by Alea Harper
Bookshelf Necklace donated by Rachel Rossano
(Please note that the Ace Carroway Paperbacks and the Bookshelf necklace are US only.)

https://kendrasgiraffecrafts.blogspot.com/p/indie-e-con.html
Coming up May 21-26 is the 2018 Indie e-Con. The theme for this completely online writing conference is fiction genres. It features informative articles, videos, critiques, a writing contest, a scavenger hunt, and more, all presented by indie authors. I participated last year, had a blast, and am looking forward to this year’s event. Go to GiraffeCrafts for all the exciting info!


The Indie e-Con is also having awards for indie books published in 2017 and early 2018. I went ahead and entered my book Suit and Suitability, just for grins. It’s on sale until May 5 for 99 cents along with all the titles nominated for the awards, so check out this page to find a host of great deals! Voting takes place during the conference. 

I hope to see you at the conference! 

 It’s Indie e-Con week!

This online writer’s conference began yesterday and goes all week on Kendra Ardnek’s blog, knittedbygodsplan.blogspot.com. Each day has a theme, and today’s theme is editing. Editing is, I confess, one of my favorite aspects of writing, but there are all different levels of editing. You can visit the conference to learn about them all, but on my blog today, I’m talking about copyediting.

Copyediting is the most technical type of editing, ferreting out grammar, punctuation, and spelling mistakes as well as other slip-ups that are blatantly wrong (such as an inconsistent character name and obvious factual errors). These things trip up a reader and make your work look less than professional, which is why copyediting is essential.

So . . . to demonstrate via a walk-through, I’ve taken a passage from one of my published books (England Adventure) and generously sprinkled it with fourteen typos. See if you can find the errors. Then, I’ll write the passage again and highlight the errors. I’ll explain each correction, and then write the passage typo-free.

Typos:

“I’m prepared to walk my feet of if I have to!!!” Caroline declared. I’m determined to see everything and anything I can.”
“Me, too!” I said My feet felt like they were on springs, adding to the desparate sense that I had to experience everything, even though I could now realize how vast England was and how impossible that would be.  We were on Purview street now, traveling the way we’d come into Madgwick, where trees, bushes, and flowers grew wildly free and only an occasional sign or bench was tucked.
“There’s so much to see and do in London.” Paris asserted fondly, as if defending a pet object. “Literally the best stores-except what’s in Paris–not to mention all those historical sites, its hard to imagine you’ll have energy for anything else that day. Like I always say, “London is the world”.”

Caught typos:

“I’m prepared to walk my feet of if I have to!!!” Caroline declared. I’m determined to see everything and anything I can.”
“Me, too!” I said My feet felt like they were on springs, adding to the desparate sense that I had to experience everything, even though I could now realize how vast England was and how impossible that would be.  We were on Purview street now, traveling the way we’d come into Madgwick, where trees, bushes, and flowers grew wildly free and only an occasional sign or bench was tucked.
“There’s so much to see and do in London.” Paris asserted fondly, as if defending a pet object. “Literally the best storesexcept what’s in Parisnot to mention all those historical sites, its hard to imagine you’ll have energy for anything else that day. Like I always say, London is the world”.

Found them? 
– Of should be off.
– There should be only one exclamation point; more than one is really not acceptable in published writing.
– Every dialogue piece should begin with double quotation marks. (At least in American English.)
– Missing period.
– Desperate is one commonly misspelled word. 
– Beware of extra blank spaces, especially at the beginning of sentences. There should only be one blank after punctuation marks.
– Streets are capitalized if they’re named.
– Dialogue ends with a comma if it’s followed by a dialogue tag (such as said or asserted).
– Em dashes that indicate breaks in thought are dashes the length of a capital M—make sure they’re long enough.
– Double hyphens aren’t enough, either.
– The comma isn’t strong enough to separate two phrases that should be two separate sentences.
– Watch out for its and it’s and other tricky homonyms and contractions.
– If someone is quoting within dialogue, single quotation marks set it off, not double. (At least in American English.)
– Quotation marks, single or double, always go outside periods and commas. (At least in American English . . . yep, the differences between British and American rules are tricky!)

And finally, the corrected text:

“I’m prepared to walk my feet off if I have to!” Caroline declared. I’m determined to see everything and anything I can.”
“Me, too!” I said. My feet felt like they were on springs, adding to the desperate sense that I had to experience everything, even though I could now realize how vast England was and how impossible that would be. We were on Purview Street now, traveling the way we’d come into Madgwick, where trees, bushes, and flowers grew wildly free and only an occasional sign or bench was tucked.
“There’s so much to see and do in London,” Paris asserted fondly, as if defending a pet object. “Literally the best stores
except what’s in Parisnot to mention all those historical sites. It’s hard to imagine you’ll have energy for anything else that day. Like I always say, ‘London is the world.’” 

                                                                                                                                   
Obviously, writing is subject to a lot more mistakes than these fourteen, but these are some of the more common ones for you to be aware of. If you have any patience for copyediting, I encourage you to learn more about the rules so you can catch them yourself. Style manuals (such as the Chicago Manual of Style) and dictionaries are the best. But it’s still a great idea to have another trained pair of eyes to look at your manuscript, too, because typos are sly little imps that are expert at hiding, and 99% of writing will still harbor a handful even after copyediting and proofreading. But that doesn’t mean that we can’t try to catch them all!

Do you have any questions about the work of copyediting? If you are a copyeditor, what are some of the most common mistakes you have to correct?